GOA: ELEPHANTS, MONKEYS AND WATERFALLS

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Whilst we were in Goa, I expected there to be plenty to do and our diaries to be full to the brim with excursions. We didn’t plan anything before arrival and quickly learnt that excursions were few and far between with the majority of them including overnight stays and/or flights. The only thing I was majorly wanting to do was meet elephants and that is how we ended up with a 5:45am start when we were already jetlagged.

After a long drive whilst the sun was rising, our first stop of the day was meeting elephants. We met two females who were beautiful who we fed and stroked. We were given a bunch ย of bananas each to feed them with and putting your hand into their mouth is a bit nerve wracking. It was all fine though but elephants have the biggest, slimiest tongues. After a few strokes and some photos, we sat down to breakfast.

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The traditional Goan breakfast consisted of fried potatoes, an omelette and some kind of slop. It wasn’t what I would usually choose for breakfast but it was edible and all washed down with a herbal tea.

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After breakfast, we headed to a village not too far away where we waited for a jeep to take us to the waterfall. Access to Dudhsager is accessible by a 45 minute off road jeep or an even longer walk. We had to wait quite a long time for the jeep to arrive whilst standing on the edge of the road with people constantly trying to sell you peanuts and bananas to take to the monkeys. Even after we bought some peanuts, they kept trying to sell to you.

Jeep after jeep went by, a local cow stole bananas out of a bag a tourist had bought and someone threw up out of a passing jeep window onto a poor girl on our excursion but we carried on waiting.

Finally, it arrived and we all crammed inside a stuffy jeep. There is a checkpoint at the edge of the national park that charges you for cameras and numbers your water bottles so you don’t leave anything behind. I didn’t declare my camera and no one checked but declaring it only cost 30โ‚น (roughly 30p).

After a 45 minute journey bumping around, we arrived at the entrance of the waterfall. We were immediately greeted by the cutest little monkeys who were all over the national park. We fed the babies handfuls of peanuts as we walked to and from the waterfall and they were adorable. The adult monkeys however were a little aggressive, snatched bags of peanuts and often chased the babies away so we didn’t feed them.

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As we approached the waterfall, a train was passing on the bridge that crosses in front of it. It was very picturesque but I wasn’t quick enough to take a snap.

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The rest of the walk was very rocky, you had to climb, clamber and hold on for balance. When we got there, we set up camp on a rock and admired the view. It was stunning and sound of the water crashing was so relaxing. Dudhsager translates to sea of milk and you can see why with the white water flowing down.

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A lot of people swam in the water but I dipped my feet in and it was absolutely freezing so I gave that a miss. There was also massive fish who apparently also like peanuts!

After a climb and a jeep back, we went to a spice plantation for lunch. We were greeted with a bindhi and flowers draped over our necks which was a nice traditional experience.

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Again, lunch was traditional Goan food and I didn’t think too much to it. All of the meat curries had bones in it which really puts me off. It’s not enjoyable having to pull small bones out of your mouth with every bite. Once again, all washed down with a herbal tea. Something I can get along with.

We got a tour of spice plantation learning about what they grow and what it can be used for, some of which was quite surprising. The owner of the spice plantation really knew her stuff and gave us a lot of valuable information.

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And that rounded up the day. We had a long journey back to the hotel where we spent the rest of the night chilling.

It was a long day with an early start but totally worth it. We got to meet and feed both elephants and monkeys which was awesome, relax by a beautiful waterfall and indulge in some Indian culture by exploring the spice plantation. It was one of my favourite days of the holiday.


All opinions are my own and just that: opinions. This blog post was not sponsored or endorsed in any way.

3 thoughts on “GOA: ELEPHANTS, MONKEYS AND WATERFALLS

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